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Photo Courtesy of the Artist

Photo Courtesy of the Artist

“This album is a collection of original music meant to highlight the conversational voices of the individuals in the band,” explains the pianist Pascal Le Boeuf on the subject of his forthcoming release, Pascal’s Triangle (Nineteen-Eight). The album features Pascal’s trio, which includes the bassist Linda Oh and the drummer Justin Brown (who led his own group at The Gallery last weekend). “We trust each other’s choices and share an orientation towards self-expression through group improvisation. Every time we sit down to make music, we are exploring the depths of what is possible.” (more…)

Photo by Peter Gannushkin, http://downtownmusic.net

Photo by Peter Gannushkin, http://downtownmusic.net

“A freethinking, gifted pianist on the scene, [Kris] Davis lives in each note that she plays,” writes the pianist Jason Moran in his Best of 2012 list for ArtForum. “Her range is impeccable; she tackles prepared piano, minimalism, and jazz standards, all under one umbrella. I consider her an honorary descendant of Cecil Taylor and a welcome addition to the fold.” In an article entitled “New Pilots at The Keyboard,“ Ben Ratliff of The New York Times adds, “Over the last couple of years in New York one method for deciding where to hear jazz on a given night has been to track down pianist Kris Davis.” (more…)

Photo via http://www.craviottodrums.com/

Photo via http://www.craviottodrums.com/

“Moments after Justin Brown sat behind a drum kit on Saturday afternoon, the mood at the National Museum of Natural History’s Baird Auditorium shifted,” writes Larry Blumenfeld in the Wall Street Journal. “When he took a solo, it expressed narrative arc more than technique. The ninth of 12 semifinalists to perform at the Thelonious Monk International Jazz Drums Competition, Mr. Brown had upped the ante, not so much by displaying skills—he did that, but so did others—as by bringing the house band together as a well-tuned vehicle fueled by clear rhythmic ideas. Above all else, that’s what good jazz drummers do, each in a personal way.” (more…)

Photo by Billie Jo Sheehan via Flickr

Photo by Billie Jo Sheehan via Flickr

Bryn Roberts is really good and really worth hearing” writes the critic Peter Hum in the Ottawa Citizen, praising the pianist’s “maturity, poise and content.” According to Hum, “The smart money is on Roberts taking off, headed for big things.” His music “has all the drive, inventiveness and originality you would expect from a person twice his age…well-played, thoughtful and erudite (not showy) jazz piano performance,” in the words of All Music.

Bryn grew up in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada, and moved to Montreal to attend McGill University in 1994. While still a student, he began turning the heads of local musicians, and was performing frequently by the time he graduated. Around this time, Bryn began an apprenticeship with the pianist Fred Hersch, released his debut album (Present Tense), and landed a spot in the touring band of Maynard Ferguson.

Before long, Bryn moved to New York, where he has steadily found work in a variety of musical situations. He’s performed with a laundry list of the city’s best mid-career jazz musicians (Chris Cheek, Chris Potter, Jaleel Shaw, John Ellis, Will Vinson, and Seamus Blake, to name just a few of the saxophonists), and is a member of the Alan Ferber Nonet. Bryn’s second album under his own name, Ludlow (Fresh Sound), features the saxophonist Seamus Blake, the bassist Drew Gress, and the drummer Mark Ferber. However, the pianist can also frequently be heard alongside folk pop artists such as Dar Williams and Juno award winner Serena Ryder, as well as numerous others from the US, UK, and Malaysia.

On Thursday, Bryn will bring his group to our stage as a part of our debut series. The ensemble features the saxophonist Seamus Blake, the bassist Orlando le Fleming, and the drummer Jochen Rueckert.

You can stream Bryn’s most recent album, Ludlow, in it’s entirety via Spotify.